W&W Report Press Kit

To set up interviews with report authors and other contacts in each state, contact:

REPORT AND PRESS RELEASE

Note: Press releases with information specific to each New England state are also available:

Maine
New Hampshire
Vermont
Massachusetts
Connecticut
Rhode Island

VIDEO

Video News Release 

B-roll (in HD) 

 

 

Photos

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The cover of the 2017 Wildlands and Woodlands conservation report. Courtesy of Highstead and the Harvard Forest.

Development claims 24,000 acres of forestland a year in New England, according to data from 1990 to 2010. By 2060, that could mean another 1.2 million acres lost. Photo by David Foster.

 Conserved forests (like those around the Quabbin Reservoir in Massachusetts, shown here at left; and Sebago Lake in Maine, shown here at right) provide clean drinking water to millions of New England residents, without the need for costly filtration plants. Photo of the Quabbin Reservoir by Clarisse Hart; Photo of Sebago Lake by Mark Hunt, courtesy of the Portland Water District.

The majority of forests in the Wildlands and Woodlands vision would be open to a variety of management types. Sustainable wood harvest supports local economies, creates new habitat for rare, open-land species, and can be compatible with carbon sequestration goals. Photo by Spencer Meyer.

The W&W vision calls for protecting at least 7% of the New England landscape as farmland, reducing the global impact of the region’s food supply by localizing fruit and vegetable production and shifting livestock increasingly towards a pasture base. Photo by Cheryl Daigle.

The Wildlands and Woodlands vision seeks to permanently protect nearly 80 percent of the landscape (30 million acres) in forestland, predominantly actively managed woodlands, expansive wildlands where nature prevails, and farmland (2.8 million acres) by 2060. Photo by David Foster.

New England forests and open land supports recreation and sporting for local residents while also engaging a $10 billion annual tourist industry. Photo by Ryan Burton.

Wildlife depend on intact landscapes that the Wildlands and Woodlands vision seeks to protect. Photo by Ryan Burton.

MAPS & FIGURES

All maps and figures from the report are included here.
Please do not publish without citing data sources.

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Figure 1 - Wildlands & Woodlands Vision for New England in 2060

 

Figure 2 - New England Forests: A Globally Important Resource

Data from:
Hansen, M. C., R. S. DeFries, J. R. G. Townshend, M. Carroll, C. Dimiceli, and R. A. Sohlberg. 2003. Global percent tree cover at a spatial resolution of 500 meters: First results of the MODIS vegetation continuous fields algorithm. Earth Interactions 7:1–15.

 

Figure 3 - New England Forest Cover and Human Population

Modified from Foster and Aber (2004) with additional data from USFS FIA state reports. Foster, D. R. and J. D. Aber. 2004. Forests in time. Yale University Press, New Haven, CT.

 

Figure 4 - New England Farmland Over Time

Data compiled from U.S. Agricultural Census reports by Brian Donahue and Sarah Sutton at Brandeis University.

 

Figure 5 - New England Today: A Peopled and Forested Landscape

Data from:
Olofsson, P., C. E. Holden, E. L. Bullock, and C. E. Woodcock. 2016. Time series analysis of satellite data reveals continuous deforestation of New England since the 1980s. Environmental Research Letters 11(6):1–8.

Homer, C. G., J. A. Dewitz, L. Yang, S. Jin, P. Danielson, G. Xian, J. Coulston, N. D. Herold, J. D. Wickham, and K. Megown. 2015. Completion of the 2011 National Land Cover Database for the conterminous United States— representing a decade of land cover change information. Photogrammetric Engineering and Remote Sensing 81(5):345–354. 

 

Figure 6 - Protecting Land for Clean Drinking Water: Massachusetts and Maine

2011 Land cover data is from the NLCD: Homer, C. G. et al. 2015 (see cited ref #8). Watershed boundaries were simplified from the USGS hydrologic unit codes. Protected open space data is from Harvard Forest and Highstead.

 

Figure 7 - Forests Improve Regional Air Quality

Data from:
Nowak, D. J., S. Hirabayashi, A. Bodine, and E. Greenfield. 2014. Tree and forest effects on air quality and human health in the United States. Environmental Pollution 193:119–129.

 

Figure 8 - Forests Store Carbon

Data from:
Kellndorfer, J., Walker, W., LaPoint, E., Bishop, J., Cormier, T., Fiske, G., Hoppus, M., Kirsch, K., and Westfall, J. 2012. NACP Aboveground Biomass and Carbon Baseline Data (NBCD 2000), U.S.A., 2000. Data set. Available on-line at http://daac.ornl.gov from ORNL DAAC, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, U.S.A.

 

Figure 9 - Forest Loss to Development

Data from:
Thompson, J. R., J. S. Plisinski, P. Olofsson, C. Holden, and M. Duveneck. In Review. Forest loss in New England: A projection of recent trends.

Olofsson, P., C. E. Holden, E. L. Bullock, and C. E. Woodcock. 2016. Time series analysis of satellite data reveals continuous deforestation of New England since the 1980s. Environmental Research Letters 11(6):1–8.

Homer, C. G., J. A. Dewitz, L. Yang, S. Jin, P. Danielson, G. Xian, J. Coulston, N. D. Herold, J. D. Wickham, and K. Megown. 2015. Completion of the 2011 National Land Cover Database for the conterminous United States— representing a decade of land cover change information. Photogrammetric Engineering and Remote Sensing 81(5):345–354.
 

Figure 10 - Land Ownership and Protection Patterns Vary Across New England

Data from:
U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Gap Analysis Program (GAP). 2016. Protected areas database of the US, PAD-US (CBI Edition).

The Nature Conservancy (TNC). 2014. Secured lands geodatabase.

Thompson, J. R., J. S. Plisinski, P. Olofsson, C. Holden, and M. Duveneck. In Review. Forest loss in New England: A projection of recent trends.

James W. Sewall Co. 2015. Geospatial mapping.
 


Figure 11
 - Many Players, Collective Impact

Data from the Harvard Forest, Highstead, and individual organizations.

 

Figure 12 - W&W Goals and Land Protection in Northern New England since 1950

Adapted from Meyer, S. R., C. S. Cronan, R. J. Lillieholm, M. L. Johnson, and D. R. Foster. 2014. Land conservation in northern New England: Historic trends and alternative conservation futures. Biological Conservation 174: 152–160.

Figure 13 - Protected Forest and Farmland in New England: Towards a Wildlands and Woodlands Future

Forest cover data from Olofsson et al. 2016 and Homer et al. 2015 (see cited refs #7 and 8). See Thompson et al. In Review (cited ref #19) for methods. Conservation data from USGS 2016 (cited ref #26). Full figure references available in the full report.

 

Figure 14 - Federal and State Conservation Funding in New England, 2004 — 2014

Data primarily from Highstead and the Trust for Public Land. Complete references available in M. Buchanan. 2016. Public conservation funding in New England: recent trends in government spending on land protection. Highstead, Redding, CT.

 

Figure 15 (a) and (b) — Regional Conservation Partnerships (RCPs) in New England 

Data from W. Labich and individual RCPs.

 

Figure 16 - ALPINE (Academics for Land Protection in New England): Tapping the Region’s Colleges and Universities to Advance Conservation

 

Figure 17 - Community Forests in New England

Data from:
Community Forest Collaborative. 2007. Community forests: a community investment strategy.

 

Figure 18 - One State’s Funding Innovation: The Community Preservation Act (CPA)

Data from:
MassGIS. 2016. Community Preservation Act (CPA) Towns. Office of Geographic Information (MassGIS), Commonwealth of Massachusetts, MassIT.